Alfred Barye (1839 – 1882)

Alfred Barye (1839 - 1882) Title:CAVALIER ARABE "Arab Huntsman on Horseback" 30" x 24" x 14" (76.20cm x 60.96cm x 35.56cm) Bronze, Signed "Barye"  Farhat Art Museum Collection.

Alfred Barye (1839 – 1882)
Title:CAVALIER ARABE “Arab Huntsman on Horseback”
30″ x 24″ x 14″
(76.20cm x 60.96cm x 35.56cm)
Bronze, Signed “Barye”
Farhat Art Museum Collection.

Alfred Barye (1839 – 1882) was born in Paris, France, the son of Antoine Louis Barye the famous Animalier sculptor, on January 21st 1839. Alfred was an accomplished artist and sculptor in his own right, but for his entire career he worked in the shadow of his much better known and more famous father. Alfred apprenticed under the tutelage of his father and expertly learned the art of bronze sand casting at a very young age while working along side his brothers in his father’s studio and foundry. Because of this early first hand knowledge of foundry techniques, his bronze sculptures show a very high degree of detail, workmanship, and finish to them. Many of his earliest works, done as a young man, are small casts of wild animals, which show the strong influence and teachings of his father. His most successful and numerous subjects were the racehorses of the day, but he is known to have modeled many works in the style of his father as well as in a style that is typically his own.

He signed many of his sculptural works Barye or A. Barye, the same signature that was used by his father. This causes as much confusion today as it did during his lifetime and many of Alfred’s models are mistakenly attributed to and sold as his father’s works. After much family disagreement and at the insistence of his father, he began signing his work Alf. Barye, and later A. Barye Fils. It has been suggested but never confirmed that Alfred Barye was responsible for quite a few unauthorized life time casts of his father’s works.

It is a documented fact that Alfred Barye continued casting his father’s models after his father’s death. There have also been some bronze sculptures reported that appear to be those of Antoine Louis Barye but bear the signature Alf. Barye. Through most of his life he was in constant conflict with his father. At times he worked in his father’s studio, and the two artists set aside their difficulties, but there were also times where neither man spoke to each other, sometimes for years.

Although not as dedicated to art as his father, it cannot be disputed that Alfred Barye is a master sculptor in his own right and recently his bronzes are accorded the respect, admiration, and values that they truly deserve.

Alfred Barye exhibited at the Paris Salon in the following years:
In 1864 he exhibited a bronze sculpture of a Racehorse titled Walter Scott.
In 1865 he exhibited several bronze sculptures of racing horses.
In 1866 he exhibited a bronze of a Racehorse and Jockey.
In 1882 he exhibited a bronze figure of an Italian Jester

The life of Alfred Barye is documented in the following books:

Les Animaliers by Jane Horswell (1971)
The Animaliers by James Mackay (1973)
Animals in Bronze by Christopher Payne (1986)
Bronzes of the 19th Century by Pierre Kjellberg (1994)
A Concise History of Bronzes by George Savage (1968)
Dictionnaire des Peintres et Sculpteurs by E. Benezit (1966)
Dictionnaire de Sculpteurs de l’ecole Francaise by Stanaslas Lami (1914)

ELLEN LANYON (1926 – 2013)

ELLEN LANYON (1926 - 2013) Allegorical Transitions, 1982  (triptych) 68 x 118in Farhat Art Museum Collection

ELLEN LANYON (1926 – 2013)
Allegorical Transitions, 1982
(triptych) 68 x 118in
Farhat Art Museum Collection

Ellen Lanyon passed away on the evening of October 7, 2013, most unexpectedly, at age 86, as she was returning from Cambridge, England, where she had been for the prior week, working on a series of new prints. Prior to her time in Cambridge, Ellen traveled to Cornwall, England, the home of her ancestry with which she felt a strong connection. With her family, she visited the cemetery where her Lanyon great-great grandparents are buried and other places where she had spent time early in her artistic career as a Fulbright scholar.

Lanyon has been an icon of the Chicago school for more than 60 years, painting in a way that harkens to both formalism and the realms of dreams and symbolism. Her works involve the most fanciful of still-lifes one could ever imagine, such as, the replication of intricate objects, like a small ceramic humidor in the shape of a frog smoking a pipe that first belonged to her grandfather, and the incorporation of natural elements in fantastical settings. Lanyon said that she felt she was a magician through her paintings, one “who can transform flowers into fire, create the animate out of the inanimate, and utilize osmosis and gravity to create illusion.” And she did through items of nostalgia, rich color pallets, and dream-like scenarios that brought her scenes to life.

Lanyon made the transition to New York City as her primary residence and studio in the late-1970s, but her heart and home has always been in Chicago.

She has had more than 75 solo exhibitions and 11 museum exhibitions, including three major traveling retrospectives. Her work is in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Union League Club, Chicago; numerous private collections in the Chicago area; and other major museums and collections in the United States and abroad.

Education: Honorary Doctorate, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, 2007 The Courtauld Institute University of London, UK MFA, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, 1950 BFA, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago,1948

Lanyon has taught painting at several institutions including the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Cooper Union and the School of Visual Arts in New York City. Lanyon received several Armstrong Prize Awards and a Logan Prize from the Art Institute of Chicago, Fulbright Study Grant, Cassandra Foundation Grant, Herewood Lester Cook Foundation Award, two National Endowment for the Arts Visual Artists Awards, Florsheim Art Foundation Grant, several Yaddo Fellowships, Ossabaw Island Project Fellowship, and two Purchase Awards from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She was elected to the Union League Club, Chicago; Century Association, New York City; and the National Academy of Design.

 

Picture of the artist Ellen Lanyon (1926 - 2013)

Picture of the artist Ellen Lanyon (1926 – 2013)

Selected Collections:
Farhat Art Museum Collection, Beirut, Lebanon
Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach, FL
Beach Museum, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS
Block Museum, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
Boston Public Library, Boston, MA
Brauer Museum of Fine Arts, Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, IN
Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY
Cleveland Center for the Arts, Cleveland, OH
Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH
Denver Art Museum, Denver, OH
Des Moines Art Center, Des Moines, IA
Galleria Comunale D’Arte Contemporanea, Arezzo, Italy
Grand Rapids Museum of Art, Grand Rapids, MI
Illinois State Museum, Springfield, IL
Institute of International Education, London, England
Krannert Museum, University of Illinois, Champaign, IL
Library of Congress, Washington, DC
Madison Art Center, Madison, WI
Marion Koogler McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, TX
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY
Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY
Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee, WI
Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, IL
National Academy, New York, NY
National Museum of American Art, Washington, DC
National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC
New Jersey State Museum, Trenton, NJ
New York Public Library, New York, NY
Palm Springs Museum, Palm Springs, CA
University of Iowa Museum of Art, Iowa City, IA
Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, CT
Washington County Museum of Art Hagerstown, MD
Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN
Williams College Museum, Williamstown, MA

Nina Levy (American, Contemporary)

Nina Levy (American, Contemporary), Seated figure, c. 1991, mixed meda sculpture, including steel, ultracal, cotton, pigment, overall: 70.5”h x 18.25”w x 28”d. Provenance: The David C. and Sarajean Ruttenberg Collection (Chicago, IL Farhat Art Museum Collection.

Nina Levy (American, Contemporary), Seated figure, c. 1991, mixed meda sculpture, including steel, ultracal, cotton, pigment, overall: 70.5''h x 18.25''w x 28''d. Provenance: The David C. and Sarajean Ruttenberg Collection (Chicago, IL (detail) Farhat Art Museum Collection.

Nina Levy (American, Contemporary), Seated figure, c. 1991, mixed meda sculpture, including steel, ultracal, cotton, pigment, overall: 70.5”h x 18.25”w x 28”d. Provenance: The David C. and Sarajean Ruttenberg Collection (Chicago, IL (detail)
Farhat Art Museum Collection.

Nina Levy attended Yale University and graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in English and art, then received an M.F.A. from the University of Chicago in 1993. Since finishing graduate school, Levy’s sculptures have been featured in many exhibitions in galleries located in several major American cities. These include one-person shows at Peter Miller Gallery and The Cultural Center, both in Chicago, and Terry Dintinfass Gallery in New York City. Sculptures by Levy were on view in outdoor installations at the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego; the Sculpture Center at Roosevelt Island, New York City; and The Milwaukee Art Museum, to name a few. In 1997 Levy was awarded the Emerging Artist Residency at Socrates Sculpture Park in Long Island City, NY. She has also been represented at several Pier Walk exhibitions in Chicago over the last several years and Centaur was shown there in 1998. This artist now resides and has a studio in Brooklyn.
More information on this artist can be found at www.ninalevy.com