Fritz Wotruba (1907 – 1975)

Fritz Wotruba was born on 23rd of April 1907 in Vienna
As the youngest of eight children. He is considered as one of the most significant Austrian sculptors of the 20th century. Many of his statues are exhibited in parks in Vienna. His father was a tailor’s assistant from Bohemia and his mother a servant girl from Hungary. As a trainee in the engraver and blanking atelier of Josef Schatin he made an apprenticeship between 1921 and 1925. Afterwards he attended free evening classes in life drawing at the Austrian Art School of the Museum of Applied Art and Industry in Vienna in 1926. In the fall semester of 1926 he began his studies for sculpting in the art school. Until the end of his studies 1928 he was a student of Anton Hanak. In Hanak´s course he met his future wife Marian Fleck, the daughter of a Jewish merchant form Düsseldorf. He married her at 27th of December 1929. After he lived from 1938 to 1945 in exile in Switzerland he worked as a professor for the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna. His greatest work was the planning of the Church of the Most Holy Trinity in Vienna which is named Wotruba Church, where he worked on until his death. Unfortunately he couldn’t experience the finishing of the church since he died unexpectedly in August 1975 in Vienna.

José Ramón Lerma (1930-)

Jose Ramon Lerma (American, b. 1930), “The Hook,” 1992, mixed media and found objects on board, signed, titled, and dated verso, overall (unframed/mounted): 37”h x 28”w.

José Ramón Lerma (1930-) Title:''Sacred Heart'' 30.50

José Ramón Lerma (1930-)
Title:”Sacred Heart”
30.50″ x 21.75″ x 1.75″
(77.47cm x 55.25cm x 4.45cm)
Assemblage
Signed and Dated 1991
Farhat Art Museum Collection

Artist: Jose Lerma Title:

Artist: Jose Lerma
Title: “Comrade,” 2007
Mixed Media
Created: 2007 Signed and Dated
Size: 25.50” x 16.25” (64.77cm x 41.28cm)
Farhat Art Museum Collection.

José Ramón Lerma (1930-) Title: The Weight of the World Mixed Media  Created: 1988 Signed and Titled Size: 16” x 12.50” (40.64cm x 31.75cm) Farhat Art Museum Collection

José Ramón Lerma (1930-)
Title: The Weight of the World
Mixed Media
Created: 1988 Signed and Titled
Size: 16” x 12.50” (40.64cm x 31.75cm)
Farhat Art Museum Collection

José Ramón Lerma (1930-)

Jose Ramon Lerma (1930 – ) American Titled: “The NAFTA Trap, Dated ” 1995, mixed media wall relief Signed and titled verso, Measures: 12.5″h x 10.5″w x 1.25″d Farhat Art Museum Collection

Jose Ramon Lerma (American, b. 1930),

Jose Ramon Lerma (American, b. 1930) “Pader,” 1980, oil on canvas signed, titled and dated lower verso canvas (unframed): 40’h x 30”w

Jose Ramon Lerma (1930 - ) American  Titled: FUCK 12  Dated " 1995, mixed media  Signed and titled verso,  Measures: 34 x15 inches  Farhat Art Museum Collection

Jose Ramon Lerma (1930 – ) American
Titled: FUCK 12
Dated ” 1995, mixed media
Signed and titled verso,
Measures: 34 x15 inches
Farhat Art Museum Collection

Born in 1930 in the Salinas Valley, Lerma came to San Francisco in 1950 and was one of the first Latino students to study at the California School of Fine Arts, now SFAI. Lerma was soon drafted into the Intelligence Division of the U.S. Army at the start of the Korean War. He was stationed close to the front and his experiences there transformed him as a person and as an artist.

He returned to San Francisco and the San Francisco Art Institute to resume his studies in the mid 50’s studying under Jean Varda, Nathan Oliviera and Edward Corbett. Lerma immersed himself in the San Francisco that was the home of Beat Culture and an important center for Abstract Expressionism. Lerma’s peers include Wallace Berman, George Herms, Roy De Forest, Bruce Conner, Manuel Neri, William T. Wiley, Luis Cervantes and Jay DeFeo.

He was integral to the burgeoning gallery scene in San Francisco in the early 60’s having solo exhibitions at seminal gallery spaces the East-West Gallery, The Cellar, Spatsa Gallery, Russian Hill Gallery and most recently a major retrospective of his paintings, collages and constructions from 1954-2000 was held at Intersection for the Arts. Lerma has also participated in numerous group exhibitions including the Oakland Museum, The San Francisco Museum of Art, The Sonoma County Museum, ArtZone 461 Gallery, Galeria de la Raza, Gallery Sanchez, Somar Gallery, Mission Cultural Center, Richmond Art Center, La Raza Graphics Center, and the Walter and McBean Galleries at SFAI. His work has also been exhibited nationally including the Chicago Museum of Contemporary Art, Museum of Albuquerque, Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, Evergreen State College, and Tuscon Museum of the Arts.

Lerma lives and works in Oakland, California

Submitted by John C. Morris,

Marino Marini (Italian, 1901-1980)

Title:Untitled (Testa di cavallo) 11.50" x 7" x 4.50" (29.21cm x 17.78cm x 11.43cm) Created: not given  Bronze Signed Lower Righ

Title:Untitled (Testa di cavallo)
11.50″ x 7″ x 4.50″
(29.21cm x 17.78cm x 11.43cm)
Created: not given
Bronze
Signed Lower Righ

Title:Untitled (Testa di cavallo) 11.50" x 7" x 4.50" (29.21cm x 17.78cm x 11.43cm) Created: not given  Bronze Signed Lower Righ

Title:Untitled (Testa di cavallo)
11.50″ x 7″ x 4.50″
(29.21cm x 17.78cm x 11.43cm)
Created: not given
Bronze
Signed Lower Righ

Marino Marini (February 27, 1901 — August 6, 1980) was an Italian sculptor.

Born in Pistoia, Marini is particularly famous for his series of stylised equestrian statues, which feature a man with outstretched arms on a horse. Probably the most famous example is The Angel of the City at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice.

He attended the Accademia Di Belle Arti in Florence in 1917. Although he never abandoned painting, Marini devoted himself primarily to sculpture from about 1922. From this time his work was influenced by Etruscan art and the sculpture of Arturo Martini. Marini succeeded Martini as professor at the Scuola d’Arte di Villa Reale in Monza, near Milan, in 1929, a position he retained until 1940.

During this period Marini traveled frequently to Paris, where he associated with Massimo Campigli, Giorgio de Chirico, Alberto Magnelli, and Filippo Tibertelli de Pisis. In 1936 he moved to Tenero-Locarno, in Ticino Canton, Switzerland; during the following few years the artist often visited Zürich and Basel, where he became a friend of Alberto Giacometti, Germaine Richier and Fritz Wotruba. In 1936 he received the Prize of the Quadriennale of Rome. He accepted a professorship in sculpture at the Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera, Milan, in 1940.

In 1946 the artist settled permanently in Milan. He participated in Twentieth-Century Italian Art at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1944. Curt Valentin began exhibiting Marini’s work at his Buchholz Gallery in New York in 1950, on which occasion the sculptor visited the city and met Jean Arp, Max Beckmann, Alexander Calder, Lyonel Feininger, and Jacques Lipchitz. On his return to Europe, he stopped in London, where the Hanover Gallery had organized a solo show of his work, and there met Henry Moore. In 1951 a Marini exhibition traveled from the Kestner-Gesellschaft Hannover to the Kunstverein in Hamburg and the Haus der Kunst of Munich. He was awarded the Grand Prize for Sculpture at the Venice Biennale in 1952 and the Feltrinelli Prize at the Accademia dei Lincei in Rome in 1954. One of his monumental sculptures was installed in the Hague in 1959.

Retrospectives of Marini’s work took place at the Kunsthaus Zürich in 1962 and at the Palazzo Venezia in Rome in 1966. His paintings were exhibited for the first time at Toninelli Arte Moderna in Milan in 1963–64. In 1973 a permanent installation of his work opened at the Galleria d’Arte Moderna in Milan, and in 1978 a Marini show was presented at the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo.

Marini died in Viareggio. There is a museum dedicated to his work in Florence (in the former church of San Pancrazio); his work may also be found in museums in Italy and around the world, such as the Civica Galleria d’Arte Moderna in Milan and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C. Marini’s work is authenticated by the experts at the Marino Marini Foundation in Pistoia, Italy.

Source:
Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marino_Marini_(sculptor)

Eduardo Tojetti (1851 – 1930)

Eduardo Tojetti (1851 - 1930) Oil on canvas, measures 39.25x 31.5 inches  signed E.Tojetti and dated 1890 lower left Farhat Art Museum Collection

Eduardo Tojetti (1851 – 1930)
Oil on canvas, measures 39.25x 31.5 inches
signed E.Tojetti and dated 1890 lower left
Farhat Art Museum Collection

Eduardo Tojetti was born in Rome, Italy on March 23, 1851. The artist began art studies at an early quite young under the guidance of his father Domenico. The Tojetti family left Rome in 1867, and lost all possessions when their ship wrecked while sailing around the Horn.

Eduardo’s family lived in Guatemala until 1871 and then settled in San Francisco where Eduardo spent the rest of his life. In 1889 he was a partner of W. P. Busch in a fresco and interior decorating business with a studio in the Murphy Building at the corner of Market and Jones. He often collaborated on mural commissions with his father and brother Virgilio.
He died in San Francisco on Nov. 27, 1930.
Exhibitions:
Mechanics’ Institute (SF), 1878, 1895
California State Fair, 1890-92
Collections:
Bohemian Club , Farhat Art Museum
Sources; San Francisco Chronicle, 11-28-1930 (obit) and 3-6-1963; OR; American Art Annual, 1931 (obit).
Source:
Edan Hughes, “Artists in California, 1786-1940”

Louis Marcoussis (1878 – 1941)

Louis Marcoussis (1878 - 1941) Oil on paper mounted on board Measures 11.5 x 8 inches  signed lower left not dated  Farhat Art Museum Collection

Louis Marcoussis (1878 – 1941)
Oil on paper mounted on board
Measures 11.5 x 8 inches
signed lower left not dated
Farhat Art Museum Collection

Louis Marcoussis was born Ludwig Casimir Ladislas Markus in Warsaw, on November 14, 1878. In 1901 he entered the Academy of Fine Arts of Cracow to study painting with Jan Crzegorz Stanislawski. In 1903 Markus moved to Paris, where he worked briefly under Jules Lefebvre at the Académie Julian* and became a friend of La Fresnaye and Robert Lotiron. He exhibited for the first time at the Salon d’Automne* in 1905 and at the Salon des Indépendants* in 1906, and was often represented in both salons in subsequent years.

In Paris he made his living by selling caricatures* to satirical periodicals, including La Vie Parisienne and Le Journal. He frequented the cafés, such as the Rotonde, Cirque Médrano and the Ermitage, where he met Edgar Degas about 1906 and Braque, Picasso and Apollinaire in 1910. In 1907 Markus abandoned painting; when he began to paint again in 1910, he discarded his earlier Impressionist* style to adopt the new Cubist* idiom. About 1911, at the suggestion of Apollinaire, be began calling himself Marcoussis, the name of a village near Monthéry. In 1912 the artist participated in the Salon de la Section d’Or at the Galerie de la Boétie in Paris. By this time his circle included Gris, Léger, Picabia, Metzinger and Max Jacob. He served in the army from 1914 to 1919, returning to Poland for a visit after his demobilization.

Marcoussis exhibited in 1921 at the gallery of Der Sturm in Berlin with Gleizes, Villon and others. He was given his first one-man show at Galerie Pierre, Paris, in 1925. This was followed by solo exhibitions in 1928 at the Galerie Le Centaure in Brussels, a city he visited on that occasion, and at the Galerie Georges Bernheim in Paris in 1929. In 1930 the artist made the first of many trips to England and ma Helena Rubinstein, who became his supporter.

In 1934-35 be stayed for several months in the United States, where one-man shows of his prints opened a The Arts Club of Chicago in 1934 and Knoedler Gallery* and Co. in New York in 1935.

Marcoussis worked almost exclusively in graphics from 1930 to 1937; a retrospective of his prints took place at the Palais des Beaux-Arts in Brussels in 1936. The artist traveled in England and Italy in 1938, and during the following year was given a solo exhibition at the London Gallery in London. In 1940, as the German army advanced, Marcoussis left Paris for Cusset, near Vichy, where he died on October 22, 1941.