Matt Glavin (1926- )

Matt Glavin, Biography

BORN:
1926 Portland, Oregon

EDUCATION:
1960 Mills College, Oakland, California, M.F.A
1956 California College of Arts and Crafts, Oakland,
California, B.F.A

TEACHING:
1977-83 University of California at Berkeley
1962-1966 University of California at Berkeley

SOLO EXHIBITIONS:
2002 Cannon Beach Art Gallery, Cannon Beach, OR
1997 Erickson & Elins Fine Art, San Francisco, CA
1994 Erickson & Elins Fine Art, San Francisco, CA
1991 Erickson & Elins Fine Art, San Francisco, CA
1989 Erickson & Elins Fine Art, San Francisco, CA
1988 Site 311, Pacific Grove, CA
1987 Erickson & Elins, Fine Art, San Francisco, CA
1983-1985 Magnolia Editions Press, Oakland, CA
1980 Source Gallery, San Francisco, CA
1977 San Jose State University, San Jose, CA
1976 Smith-Anderson Gallery, San Francisco, CA
1975 Richmond Art Gallery, Richmond, CA
1977 Smith-Anderson Gallery, San Francisco, CA
1969 Hansen-Fuller Gallery, San Francisco, CA
1964 Primus Stuart Gallery, Los Angeles, CA

TWO-PERSON EXHIBITIONS:
2005 Cannon Beach Art Gallery, Cannon Beach, OR
1989 Shidoni Contemporary Art Gallery, Santa Fe, NM
1986 Magnolia Editions Press, Oakland, CA
1978 Source Gallery, San Francisco, CA
1975 Linda Ferris Gallery Seattle, WA
1969-1971 LASER ENVIRONMENTS: Traveling Shows
Fort Wroth Museum, Fort Worth, TX
Fine Arts Gallery of San Diego, CA
University of New Mexico
University of Pennsylvania
Akron Art Museum, OH
Rhode Island School of Design
Joslyn Art Institute Museum, Omaha, NB
Japan Art Society: “Three Cities in Japan”
Light, Motion and Sound (3 pieces) – Hudson River Museum
Galeria Bonio (5 pieces) – New York, NY
Oakland Art Museum, Oakland, CA – laser installation

GROUP EXHIBITIONS:
2004 Erickson & Elins Fine Art, San Francisco, CA
2002 Erickson & Elins Fine Art, San Francisco, CA
2001 Magnolia Editions Press, Oakland, CA
1999 Erickson & Elins Fine Art, San Francisco, CA
1990 Shidoni Contemporary Art Gallery, Santa Fe, NM
1987 Sioux City Art Center, Sioux City, IO
1986 University of California Printmakers, Walnut Creek, CA
1983 Oakland Museum (Storefront Gallery) Oakland, CA
1983 Smith-Anderson Gallery, San Francisco, CA
1983 Magnolia Editions Press, Oakland, CA
1983 Edna Young Gallery, San Jose, CA
1982 DeSaisset Museum, Santa Clara, CA
1981 Magnolia Editions Press, Oakland, CA
1974 Oakland Art museum, Public Sculpture urban Environment
1972 Philadelphia Civic Center, Philadelphia, PA – drawings
1971 University of Cincinnati, Fine Art Collection – drawings
1971 The Canton art Institute, Canton, OH
1970 Corcoran Gallery, Washington, DC – drawings
1968 San Francisco Museum of Art, San Francisco, CA – paintings
1967 California State College, Hayward, CA – “Four Sculptors”
1966 Hansen Gallery, San Francisco, CA
1965 Hansen Gallery, San Francisco, CA
1964 Dubins Gallery, Los Angeles, CA
1963 San Francisco Museum of Art, SECA Fourth Selection
1962 Primus Stuart Gallery, Los Angeles, CA
1962 Pasadena Museum, Pasadena, CA – collage show
1961 San Francisco Museum of Art, San Francisco, CA – print show
1960 San Francisco Museum of Art, San Francisco, CA – paintings
1959 Richmond Museum, Richmond, CA – drawings and prints
1960 San Francisco Museum of Art, San Francisco, CA – paintings
1958 San Francisco Museum of Art, San Francisco, CA – drawings and prints
1957 American Artists, Paris, France
1956 San Francisco Museum of Art, San Francisco, CA – paintings

INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF EXPERIMENTAL PRINTMAKING SHOWS
1977-1978 National Museum, Washington, DC
1976 Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, NY
1976 Santa Barbara Museum, Santa Barbara, CA
1976 Rice Institute, Houston, TX
1976 Lester Gallery, Inverness, CA
1975 Smith-Anderson Gallery, San Francisco, CA
1975 Polly Freidlander Gallery, Seattle, WA
1975 Cleveland Art Institute, Cleveland, OH
1975 Sacred Heart School, Menlo Park, CA
1975 University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

COLLECTIONS:
California College of Arts and Crafts, Oakland, CA
San Francisco Museum of Art, San Francisco, CA
Oakland Museum, Oakland, CA
City of San Francisco
Container Corporation of America
Westinghouse Corporation
Dewey & Craig, Foster City, CA
The Rucker Company, Oakland, CA
Carroll, Burdick & McDonough, Oakland, CA
The Bank of California, San Francisco, CA
Environmental Protection Agency, San Francisco, CA
Boraccia & Associates, Petaluma, CA
ARCO Chemical Company, Newton Square, PA
AT&T
Radius
Kaiser Permanente, Dallas, TX
Kaiser Permanente, Roseville, CA
Homart Development, South San Francisco, CA
City of Sunnyvale, CA

Michael Diven ( 1943- )

Artist: Michael Diven ( 1943- ) American  Measures: 36x36 inches / Oil on Canvas  Titled: Phase 4 / # 30 and dated 1970  signed Diven on reverse.  Farhat Art Museum Collection.

Artist: Michael Diven ( 1943- ) American
Measures: 36×36 inches / Oil on Canvas
Titled: Phase 4 / # 30 and dated 1970
signed Diven on reverse.
Farhat Art Museum Collection.

Artist: Michael Diven ( 1943- ) American  Measures: 48 x 47.5 inches / Oil on Canvas  Titled: Phase 4 / # 25 and dated 1970  signed Diven on reverse.  Farhat Art Museum Collection.

Artist: Michael Diven ( 1943- ) American
Measures: 48 x 47.5 inches / Oil on Canvas
Titled: Phase 4 / # 25 and dated 1970
signed Diven on reverse.
Farhat Art Museum Collection.

Michael Diven  48 x 48 inches  Airbrush on canvas  dated 1970 Farhat Art Museum Collection

Artist: Michael Diven ( 1943- ) American Measures: 48 x 48 inches Air brush / Acrylic on Canvas Titled: Phase 4 # 16 and dated 1970 signed Diven on reverse. Farhat Art Museum Collection.

Michael Diven Airbrush on canvas  40x 60 inches dated 1970 Farhat Art Museum Collection

Artist: Michael Diven ( 1943- ) American Measures: 40 x 60 inches Air brush / Acrylic on Canvas Titled: phase 4 / # 28 and dated 1970 signed Diven on reverse. Exhibited at San Francisco Museum of arts 28-1971 Farhat Art Museum Collection.

Michael Diven    Airbrush  48 x30 inches Acrylic dated 1967 Farhat Art Museum Collection

Artist: Michael Diven ( 1943- ) American Measures: 48 x 30 inches Air brush / Acrylic on Canvas Titled: phase 4 / # 10 and dated 1969 signed Diven on reverse. Farhat Art Museum Collection.

Artist Statement:
I was born and raised in Utah where my high school art teacher inspired me to seriously pursue art. After high school I moved to Los Angeles, California, to attend art school, but instead, surfed and painted for the next few years. I later returned to school, studying art at the University of Nevada, Reno, and the San Francisco Art Institute, where I earned an MFA degree in painting. I taught painting and drawing for 15 years at several West Coast colleges and universities. Four years ago I moved from Northern California to the Philadelphia area. My art has been exhibited nationally in major galleries and museums and is included in numerous public and private collections.

The inspiration for my art comes from dreams and dream research, memories, stories, everyday occurrences and political or environmental concerns. I create my art to be visually interesting as well as intellectually and spiritually provocative. Although the subject matter is diverse, the techniques used in the paintings and drawings serve as a “thread” tying the work together. The symbols in my art represent transitions, conversations with the past, or a search for new growth and promise for the future. The words and numbers in some pieces become part of the design as well as hinting at the narrative. the figure may represent a participant, an observer, a witness, a victim or a survivor, depending on the scenario. Art critics have described my art as, “broad and rewarding,” “infinitely rich,” and “bold and captivating”

SOLO EXHIBITIONS: Partial List
Pagus Gallery, Norristown, PA, “Still Here” 2013
Phoenix Village Art Center, Phoenixville, PA 2012
James Snidle Gallery, Chico, CA, “Stories, Dreams, Facts and Figures” 2010
Coyote Gallery, Chico, CA, “And So It Goes” 2008
“Art in Public Places” Project, Redding, CA, 2008
Avenue 9 Gallery, Chico, CA, “Figures x 2” 2006
Avenue 9 Gallery, Chico, CA, “Visions, Dreams, and Memories” 2004
American Institute of Architects, Fine Arts Gallery, Oakland, CA, 1984
Sheppard Fine Arts Gallery, University of Nevada, Reno, NV, 1982
Gallery of Visual Arts, University of Montana, Missoula, MT, 1976 and 1978
Media Generalists, San Francisco, CA, 1976
Hartnell College Fine Arts Gallery, Salinas, CA, 1973
Triangle Gallery, San Francisco, CA, 1972
Sierra College Fine Arts Gallery, Rocklin, CA, 1972
Hansen-Fuller Gallery, San Francisco, CA, 1971
Triangle Gallery, San Francisco, CA, 1970
Nevada Museum of Art, Reno, NV, 1970
Richard White Gallery, Seattle, WA, 1969
Central Washington State College Gallery of Art, Ellensburg, WA, 1969
University of Nevada, Jot-Travis Gallery, Reno, NV, 1967
GROUP EXHIBITIONS: Partial List
GoggleWorks Center for The Arts , Reading, PA, Juried Exhibition, 2013
Lyceum Hall Center for the Arts, Burlington, NJ, “Art Spirits” 2012
Soho 20 Gallery, NYC, “Backlash” International Exhibition, 2012
University of Nevada, Reno, “Far Out” Invitational Exhibit, 2012
Museum of Northern California Art, Chico, CA, Traveling Group Exhibition, 2012
Main Line Art Center, Haverford, PA, Professional Artists Group Exhibition, 2012
“Best of Show” Award, Annual Juried Exhibition, Phoenix Village Art Center, Phoenixville, PA, 2011
North First Art Space, San Jose, CA, “50 Years of Artwork,” 2010
Triangle Gallery, San Francisco, CA, “The Present,” 2010
Triangle Gallery, San Francisco, CA, “Figure/Ground,” San Francisco, CA, 2010
Gallery 1078, Chico, CA, “Ekphrasis” Project, 2010
Triangle Gallery, San Francisco, CA, 2009
University Art Gallery, California State University, Chico, & Gallery 1078, Chico, CA, 2008
Sanchez Art Center, Pacifica, CA, “The Buddy Show” Group Invitational, 2007
Exploding Head Gallery, Sacramento, CA, “5 Year Anniversary” Gallery Artists, 2006
Exploding Head Gallery, Sacramento, CA, “The Shape of Words” Group Invitational, 2005
Avenue 9 Gallery, Chico, CA, “Openings” Group Invitational, 2004
Harcourt’s Contemporary Art Gallery, San Francisco, CA, 1984
Museum of Art, Boise, ID, “Artists from Montana” 1977
University of Montana, Missoula, MT, “Drawing from Montana” Invitational, 1977
Wake-Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC “Montana Artists, 1976”
Triangle Gallery, San Francisco, CA, “15 Years” 1976
University of Nevada, Reno, NV, Invitational Exhibition, 1975-1976
Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA, Faculty Exhibition, 1975-1976
Humboldt Cultural Center, Eureka, CA, Two Person Exhibit, 1975
College of the Redwoods, Eureka, CA, Faculty Exhibition, 1974
California State University, Fullerton, CA, “In a Bottle” Invitational, 1973
Nevada Art Gallery, Reno, NV, “Contemporary Painting and Sculpture” Invitational, 1973
San Francisco Art Institute, San Francisco, CA, Group Invitational, 1972
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, CA, Holiday Invitational, 1970 – 1971
San Francisco Art Institute and SFMOMA, Annual Juried Exhibition, 1966 and 1971
University of California, Davis, CA, Juried Group Exhibition, 1971
Stanislaus State College, Turlock, CA, “San Francisco Artists” 1971
The Art Company, Sacramento, CA, “17th Annual Northern California Exhibition” 1970
State Capitol Museum, Olympia, WA, “Governor’s Invitational Exhibition” 1970
Cheney-Cowles Museum of Art, Spokane, WA, “Young Artist’s Invitational” 1970
Cheney-Cowles Museum of Art, Spokane, WA, Annual Juried Exhibition, 1969
Seattle Center Museum, Seattle, WA, Juried Water Media Exhibition, 1969
Gordon Woodside Gallery, Seattle, WA, Group Show, 1969
Dulin Gallery, Knoxville, TN, “5th National Print and Drawing Competition” 1969
University of Nevada, Reno, NV, “West Coast Painting Invitational”. 1969
Western Washington State College, Bellingham,” 5th Annual Drawing Exhibition”. 1968
Purdue University, Lafayette, IN, “Max 24-66” Painting Exhibition. 1966
AWARDS and GRANTS:
University of Montana, Missoula, MT. “Montana Site Works”. Research Grant. 1977
Auburn, CA. “26th A.A.U.W. Exhibition”. Honorable Mention. 1974
Auburn, “CA. 25th A.A.U.W. Exhibition”, Best in Show Award. 1973
Auburn, CA. “Etc. 5 Exhibition”. Second Award. 1972
San Francisco Art Institute, San Francisco, CA. Scholarship Grant. 1972
University of Nevada, Reno, NV. Guest Juror, 1971
Cheney- Cowles Museum of Art, Spokane, WA, Annual Juried Exhibition, Best of show Award, 1969
REVIEWS:
San Francisco Chronicle, San Francisco, CA. 6/28/1972
The Sacramento Bee, Sacramento, CA. 11/5/1972
The San Francisco Examiner, San Francisco, CA. 7/5/1972
San Francisco Chronicle, San Francisco, CA. 5/11/1971
Artweek, 5/15/1971
Artforum Magazine, November 1970
The San Francisco Examiner, San Francisco, CA. 9/1/1970
San Francisco Chronicle, San Francisco, CA. 8/27/1970
Seattle Times, Seattle WA. 9/28/1969
Seattle Post Intelligencer, Seattle, WA. 9/28/1969
Chico Art Review Magazine, Chico, CA, 9/2004
California Guide to The Arts Magazine, Sacramento, CA, Spring 2004, Winter 2005
Art Guild of Pacifica, CA, Newsletter
Paradise Post Newspaper, Paradise, CA, 9/25/2008
Enterprise Newspaper, Chico, CA, 9/4/2008
InsideOut Magazine, Chico, CA, Spring 2009
Chico News & Review, Chico, CA, 5/2009
Phoenixville, News, Phoenixville, Pa, 3/31/2012
COLLECTIONS:
Works included in many private and public collections including: San Francisco Arts Commission, San Francisco Hall of Justice, People’s Bank of Seattle, May Collection, L.A., Freeman Ford Collection, Media Generalist’s, S.F., permanent collections at University of Montana, Missoula, Central Washington State University, Ellensburg, and University of Nevada, Reno. Private collections include James Snidle and Franco Mancini, San Francisco, Pat and Richard Macias, Maria Phillips, and the Museum of Northern California Art, Chico, CA, and Linda Welch, Portland, OR.
TEACHING EXPERIENCE:
California State University, Chico, CA. Art Instructor, painting and drawing. 2006-2008
Truckee Meadows College, Reno, NV. Art Instructor, painting and drawing. 1982-1983
University of Nevada, Reno, NV. Art Instructor, painting and design. 1981-1982
University of Montana, Missoula, MT. Assistant Professor, painting, drawing, and design. Gallery Director. 1976-1978
Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA. Visiting Assistant Professor, painting, drawing, and design. 1974-1975
College of the Redwoods, Eureka, CA. Art instructor, painting, drawing, design, and contemporary art history. 1974-1975
EDUCATION:
San Francisco Art Institute, San Francisco, CA. 1970-1972, MFA Degree, Painting
University of Nevada, Reno, NV. 1966-1968 Art Major

Geoffrey Bowman(1928- 2009)

Geoffrey Bowman(1928- 2009) American  Oil and mix media on canvas  Size 72 x 60 inches  Signed on reverse / date 1985  Titled: Orange Intrusion  Farhat Art Museum Collection.

Geoffrey Bowman(1928- 2009) American
Oil and mix media on canvas
Size 72 x 60 inches
Signed on reverse / date 1985
Titled: Orange Intrusion
Farhat Art Museum Collection.

The Artist

The Artist

By Theta Belcher, Assistant Gallery Director,
San Jose State School of Art and Design

Geoffrey Bowman was born with a keen intellect and a mind filled with curiosity about the world around him. As a consequence, Geoffrey led a richly varied life. During his lifetime he earned his living as a Navy sailor, insurance salesman, taxi cab driver, mail carrier, prison art teacher, SJSU professor, and as an artist. During that same lifetime Geoffrey seriously pursued and became intimately acquainted with the cooking and eating of good food, the calligraphy and spoken word of the Japanese language, growing tomatoes and eggplants, world history both ancient and modern, politics, bebop, opera, jazz, playing the tenor saxophone badly (Geoffrey felt that it was the only instrument that had a truly human musical voice), eastern philosophy, and above all his art, both printmaking and painting.

Geoffrey was born in San Francisco 1928. He had fond memories of his frequent visits as a child to Golden Gate Park, including the Japanese Tea Garden and the DeYoung Museum, where he developed an early interest in Asian Art.

In 1946, unhappy with high school–which included an obligatory half-day of factory work–Geoffrey quit school and joined the Navy. During this enlistment Geoffrey sailed to China, Korea, the Philippines, and Hawaii. The timing and intensity of this travel affected Geoffrey for the rest of his life.

Two years later, after being discharged from the Navy, Geoffrey earned his high school equivalency diploma. Five years later Geoffrey met and married his first wife Mill, and graduated from San Francisco State University with a BA in Social Science. During this time he also became intensely interested in art and printmaking and began to study art formally. By 1957 Geoffrey had earned his graduate degree in art and began to teach art in San Quentin. At this time he was also beginning to be noticed in the art community of the Bay Area.

In 1960 Geoffrey left his teaching job at San Quentin to spend more time working on his art. He also began an intensive investigation of I Ching and Asian philosophy at the American Academy of Asian Studies in San Francisco. During this time to support himself and his wife Geoffrey drove a taxi at night so that he could have his days free to work in the studio.

A pivotal moment in Geoffrey’s life occurred when in 1964 he joined the art faculty at San Jose State University and moved to San Jose. Through his stature as an artist, his concern for his students, and his high technical ability as a printer he became a valued faculty member; and was promoted to full professor status in 1973. Geoffrey taught at SJSU for twenty-nine years, specializing in lithography and intaglio printmaking techniques. Geoffrey had the ability to present complex concepts and techniques with such skill that his students achieved a consistently high level of creative expression. The effectiveness of Geoffrey‚Äôs academic assignments are well documented.

Simultaneously Geoffrey was deeply involved in his own work and had accumulated an impressive professional exhibition record. Geoffrey’s work was exhibited regionally, nationally, and internationally. Geoffrey is in several public permanent collections including the San Jose Museum of Art, San Francisco Museum of Art, Achenbach Foundation of Graphic Arts San Francisco, Lannan Foundation New York, and Crown Press Berkeley.

In 1970 Geoffrey took a year sabbatical from teaching and spent a year in Japan. Indicative of his thorough and methodical attitude toward all elements in his life, Geoffrey prepared for this sabbatical with renewed extensive study of the history, philosophy, and language of that country. While there, he produced a limited edition book; each of which contained twenty hand-pulled prints. This book, titled ‘Book of Changes,’ was published in co-operation with The University of Tokyo Press.

After retiring from teaching in 1994 Geoffrey turned to painting as his primary mode of expression. Although there was a media shift he continued to focus on one subject: the consistency of change. The phenomenon of change – transience – it was a lifelong fascination for Geoffrey. To express these abstract concepts, over the years Geoffrey invented a highly personal and attractive abstract visual language – his own visual syntax – replete with eccentric forms and complex surfaces and patterns, which seem to be in constant flux, shifting with varied light sources and viewing angles. This he accomplished in part with combinations of paint and an assortment of reflective materials such as metallic flake and leaves, glass beads, and light-refracting pigments.

Geoffrey became quite private in his later years and had his last one-man public exhibition in 2001 at the Fredrick Spratt Gallery in San Jose.

Geoffrey Bowman was a gentleman, a scholar, and an artist; all those who knew him will miss him.

Geoffrey C. Bowman December 29, 1928 – October 9

Andreas Nottebohm (1944 – )

Andreas Nottebohm (1944 - ) American  Acrylic on canvas  Measures 43.5x39.5  Signed lower middle and dated 1984  Farhat Art Museum Collection.

Andreas Nottebohm (1944 – ) American
Acrylic on canvas
Measures 43.5×39.5
Signed lower middle and dated 1984
Farhat Art Museum Collection.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andreas_Nottebohm



Biography of the artist:
Andreas Nottebohm was born in Eisenach, East Germany, on October 13, 1944. From 1965 to 1969, he studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich, West Germany, under Professor Mac Zimmerman. In 1968, he studied etching at J. Friedlander’s workshop in Paris, France. From 1971 to 1974, he studied lithography in Salzburg, Austria. He returned to Munich in 1974 and became a member of the Salzburg Group ’73 in 1975. In 1978, Mr. Nottebohm made his first visit to America for a one-man show with Gallery Hilger (Vienna) at WASH-ART in Washington, D.C. Since then, Andreas Nottebohm’s work has played a significant role in the world¹s recognition that our universe is a vital part of our environment.

1992 Assignment to document a night main engine test firing. 1991 Assignment to document the Virtual Reality Research activities at the NASA Ames Research Center in California. Selected as a member of a four person art team assigned by NASA to document space activities in the Soviet Union. Travels to Moscow and Baykonour (Kasachstan). 1990 Assignment to document launch and landing of the Space Shuttle Discovery (Hubble Space Telescope Mission). 1989 Assignment to document the Voyager II close encounter with Neptune. 1988 Assignment to attend the first launch after the Challenger accident. 1985 Painting of the first night launch included in a NASA release of ten lithographs presented as Selections from NASA Art Program . 1983 Assignment to attend first night launch of the Space Shuttle. Painting selected for the official poster for NASA’s 25th Anniversary celebration, Houston, Texas; artist in attendance. 1982 Assignment to attend the third launch of the Space Shuttle Columbia. Painting selected from the NASA Art Collection for the official poster representing the United States at the United Nations Conference, “Peaceful Exploration of Space,” Vienna, Austria. 1981 Invitation to attend the launch of the space shuttle, Columbia, at Cape Canaveral. Assignment to attend the Close Encounter with Saturn, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

Article about the artist and his work:
The Pure Metal Paintings of Andreas Nottebohm

The death of traditional painting gets perennially exaggerated. But as it has proved time and time again, painting has more lives than a shut-in’s runaway litter of freeway darting felines.

Even as nowadays, many conceptually-oriented contemporary painters are becoming more apt to paint with pixels rather than with traditional oils or acrylics, there is that occasional eccentric who manages to put a new and unabashedly low-tech spin or two on this messy indestructible medium as we delve deeper into the Digital Age. One such figure is German-born Bay Area-based Andreas Nottebohm whose recalcitrant, industrial-chic paintings on raw aluminum (and occasionally copper) hover evocatively halfway between painting and sculpture – resurrecting mid-60s fascination with “object-hood” even as they obliterate the minimalist’s obsession with order by cultivating the potential profundity of randomness. If these robust, shimmering, objects don’t exactly bring to mind those new-fangled gimmicky designer canvases that churn colorfully inside glowing LED monitors today, they nonetheless eschew easy pigeonholing and blithe classification, preferring instead to exist in a state of baroque, genre-blurring flux, wryly morphing into something dazzlingly new in effects that depend on how light strikes their reflective metallic surfaces. Here, we need to realize that Nottebohm’s brush is, in fact, a power sander-grinder that operates in a similar manner to a sculptor’s chisel. So it comes as little surprise that the resulting scraped, scratched, scumbled and pocked surfaces give rise to crater-like light traps. Fortunately, what emerges from this corrosive process usually rubs viewers the right way.

Whereas geocentric Renaissance painters, with their minds and feet planted firmly on the ground under Newton’s apple tree, viewed their paintings as ‘windows onto the world’, Nottebohm refers to his paintings as ‘windows into the Universe’. Unlike a ‘timeless’ Renaissance painting depicting, say, a Madonna and Child in which the figures remain frozen in time, bound together in the familiar pyramidal composition – that most stable of shapes — Nottebohm’s universe marks the passage of time as the viewer’s shifting vantage point plays a pivotal role in bringing his paintings to life. Indeed, the constituent -elements – here remain paradoxically, in flux and while some of his paintings appear at first glance to ostensibly border on the non-objective anchored to nothing, on further perusal allusions –or illusions– to art history and nature abound: Leonardo-esque sfumato (smoky mist), German Romanticist seascapes, Zen-flavored abstract expressionism offshoots, for a start.

Before the direct use of color began leeching out of his paintings a few years ago, Nottebohm’s work was a phantasmagoric cornucopia whose colorful, light-soaked landscapes combined the terrestrial and the celestial – to boldly go where no painting has gone before, as it were: Luminous abstractions chock-full of black holes, worm holes, celestial orbs that doubled as an atom’s nucleus, gravity, and myriad Electro-magnetic radiation. One might expect to behold ribboned Aurora Borealis-es shooting up from craggy, primordial rock formations stretching across the horizon. Their incessant, bilateral symmetry, meanwhile, bring to mind trippy, acid-soaked George O’Keefes. In rendering the invisible visible, the artist seems to be saying that ‘reality’ – that most slippery of terms — is more magical and fantastic than we can possibly imagine. Perhaps this is why the artist considers himself a ‘realist’ painter rather than a simply an adroit creator of fantasyscapes or purveyor of psychedelic science fiction.

A recent piece like the large buff silvery gray painting [Nottebohm prefers to leave his paintings untitled, playful quasi-scientific designations – KN-1686 or OP30 – sound like outtakes from the Elemental Table – designation 0P30 -] would fare equally well inside a dilapidated bomb-shelter or corporate lobby. While it might not rock the boats of most corporate movers and shakers, it’s smoke-ring sfumato, moody tenebrism, and broad circular swaths coalesce to suggest waves or some other natural tempest ala Turner’s 1843 Morning after the Deluge, and contribute to a decidedly neo-romantic aura. The aluminum ‘canvas’ calligraphic abstract field of marks and scratches, in turn, also locates it within the abstract expressionist realm. Another recent large painting (48″x48″) with its wriggling flurry of lines receding into the distance, is embedded with wiry rivers of molten light whose abstract rivulets of energy make it look as if the artist has laid bare an unending bio-electric circulatory system. This is a particularly good example of how the artist deftly conflates the subatomic, terrestrial and cosmic scales.

Needless to say, Nottebohm’s art hovers at the interface of art and science on a number of fronts: The ghostly vapor trails and Zen-like wisps that dance across the buff surface of becoming and vanishing bring to mind elusive subatomic particles inside Donald Glaser’s bubble chamber. It’s little wonder that his art has received raves from the likes of people such as legendary science/fiction author Ray Bradbury (noted physicist Stephen Hawking owns a piece) For the past two decades, Nottebohm has literally been NASA’s poster child periodically called upon to document events. If some of the NASA poster commissions occasionally sputter operatically over the top, the best (i.e. more restrained) posters conjure up the sublime canvases of 19th century American landscape painter Frederick Edwin Church.

As compelling as Nottebohm’s abstract energy fields can be when seen under natural (or artificial) illumination, the real magic takes place when the lights go down. Here, these monumental paintings’ fundamentally flat surfaces assume an added dimension as they morph into 3-D hologram blues that seems to hover tantalizingly just beneath the surface (akin to those glittering vodka ads in one might find in, say, TIME Magazine). I’ve long felt the holographic paintings would be a next step in the evolution of traditional painting. Perhaps Nottebohm will be seen as a pioneer in a field that has just begun to be mined. (Not surprisingly, light is the critical element that brings holograms to life. Viewed in a dark room with changing lighting, where icy blues give way to smoldering reds, the metallic tabula rasa generate something akin to a trippy video installation. The effect can be quite mesmerizing.

As always, the hallmark any work of art is to successfully withstand the test of time. With its taut melding of visual (‘retinal’ in Duchamp’s reductive terms) and conceptual components, there’s a lot more here than first meets the eye. Indeed, Nottebohm’s raw yet refined paintings on aluminum lend themselves to rich multi-layered metaphors seemingly capable of continual regeneration that give viewers something very complex to look at and think about over time. And in doing so, Nottebohm has made an admirable contribution to help painting elude the grim reaper yet again. – Harry Roche

Harry Roche is a Bay Area Based Art Critic and Curator at Large.