Kenneth Showell (1939 – 1997)

Artist: Kenneth Showell (1939 - 1997) American Titled: Composition (N.D.S), 1969 Measures: 116.75" x 112.00" (296.55cm x 284.48cm) Acrylic / Canvas.  Farhat Art Museum Collection.

Artist: Kenneth Showell (1939 – 1997) American
Titled: Composition (N.D.S), 1969
Measures: 116.75″ x 112.00″ (296.55cm x 284.48cm)
Acrylic / Canvas.
Farhat Art Museum Collection.

 

Kenneth L. Showell (* 1939 in Huron, South Dakota; † 1997) was an American painter. He was known for his abstract paintings in the style of lyrical abstraction known.
life and work.
Kenneth Showell studied at Kansas City Art Institute and moved in 1965 after New York. In 1967 and 1969, he turned in two group exhibitions at the Whitney Museum of American Art from. In 1969 he exhibited at the David Whitney Gallery in New York his work in a solo exhibition. From 2006 to 2008 was his painting in the exhibition “High Times, Hard Times: New York Painting 1967-1975” at the Neue Galerie Graz and in the Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe [1] shown in Karlsruhe.
His works are in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art [2] and the Whitney Museum of American Art [3] represented in New York. Farhat Art Museum collection.

Ken Showell died in 1997 at the age of fifty-eight. The Folded Painting Series were shown at the David Whitney Gallery in 1969-70. Ken supposedly destroyed most of these folded paintings and left only his landscapes (mosty of Central Park) and his still lifes. He was best known for his abstractions.

 Ken Showell photographed my paintings for years. He was one of the most amiable men I ever met in the art world, and one of the most discreet. He never gossiped about his customers, partly because he saw everyone as a friend. He was self-effacing to a fault, so I was surprised, at first, by the transparencies of his paintings that he began to show me in later years. He was a true, even luscious painter, maybe not great or whatever, but solid and he had a quintessential touch, a natural painterliness and, forgive me, a modesty before nature that I envied. He was once an abstract painter but figuration served his eye, his touch and his sweetness best, acknowledging his limits, he was also wise. He could not have made a fortune, I have learned since his death, given his reasonable prices. In fact he never changed them as far as I can recall. He did this I think because he wanted to keep the company of artists and not impose. He tried always to be the bearer of good news, I never heard him complain, even on the day he went to the hospital and I happened to call. He was one of the good guys.

 Sidney Tillim , September 5, 1997

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