Artist: Marcia Roberts ( Born 1946) American Titled: “Pacifica”. San Mateo Series Medium: Oil on canvas, laid on board Dated: 2006. Signed, titled and dated on the reverse.

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Measures: (22″ x 30″) inches
Farhat Art Museum Collection

Marcia Roberts was born and raised in Los Angeles where she attended Hollywood High School. She received a Bachelor of Arts Degree (Fine Arts) from Connecticut College and studied at Falmouth School of Art, Falmouth England. During the 1970’s Roberts established her studio in Santa Monica where her interest in light and space led to experimentation with various technologies and materials. Eventually she came full circle and returned to paint and brush to achieve the optical and spatial dynamics she sought.
Her first solo exhibit was in 1981 at the Asher-Faure Gallery in Los Angeles. After a several year hiatus, she began showing again in the late nineties and in 2000 had a solo show in Los Angeles, and later an exhibit at the Peter Blake Gallery in Laguna Beach.
While her studio is located on the Central Coast of California, she remains an active participant in the Southern California art scene. The work may seem to be about light and space, light and surface, and her goal is to challenge the viewer with perceptions of but the dynamics of her paintings.
Selected Bibliography
2003 The Orange County Register Roberta Carasso
2003 Art Scene Roberta Carasso
2001 Los Angeles Times – Leah Ollman 2000 Art in America – Michael Duncan
1999 Los Angeles Times – David Pagel
1981 Los Angeles Times – Suzanne Muchnic
Biography from Peter Blake Gallery
EDUCATION
1967 Connecticut College – BA Fine Arts
1968 England, Falmouth School of Art
BIBLIOGRAPHY
2003 The Orange County Register – Roberta Carasso
2003 Art Scene – Roberta Carasso
2001 Los Angles Times – Leah Ollman
2000 Art in America – Michael Duncan
2000 Los Angles Times – David Pagel
1981 Los Angles Times – Suzanne Muchnic
ARTIST STATEMENT
It may seem to be about light and space, light and surface. But what becomes necessary is time. This is not a situation where what you see is what you get. What you perceive in the first five seconds is different than what you see ten seconds later or two hours later when the light in the room has changed or you are standing at a different angle, different distance. If one invests the time, the painting becomes many paintings. Earlier work involved special lights and materials but that frequently resulted in the static, predictable state I was trying to avoid. I went back to paint and brush to try to achieve an ever-changing painting as light changes through the course of the day. It takes a very long time to make one of these paintings in order to have something that surprises me. Maybe it’s not about time or perception, but about patience.

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